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Glossary Definitions for Words beginning with "V"

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Value
The amount of darkness or lightness in a color.
Value Scale
A chart that shows the range of shades of one color from light too dark.
Variegated
Showing diversity in the natural color pattern by the use of different hues.
Vat
A tub or a tank used for dyeing.
Vat Dyeing
Also called Tub Dyeing, or Garment dyeing. The basic method for solid color dyeing. You can use buckets, a bathtub, the washing machine or even plastic garbage pails. You need lukewarm water, around 105 ° F, soda ash to fix the dye, non-iodized salt and Synthrapol as a pre-wash and after wash. *Not to be confused with Vat Dyes*
Vat dyes
are a special class of dyes that work with a special chemistry. Cotton, wool, and other fibers can be all dyed with vat dyes. Note that not all vat dyeing is done with vat dyes! Most vat dyes are less suitable than fiber reactive dyes for the home dyers, as they are difficult to work with; they require a reducing agent to make them soluble. The dye is soluble only in its reduced (oxygen-free) form. The fiber is immersed (sometimes repeatedly) in this oxygen-free dyebath, then exposed to the air, whereupon the water-soluble reduced form changes color as oxygen turns it to the water-insoluble form. Indigo is an example of this dye class; it changes from yellow, in the dyebath, to green and then blue as the air hits it. Once insoluble, the dye won't come out of the fabric in the presence of water. Inkodye is a Light-oxidized Vat Dye. This type of vat dye is a class of vat dye which uses light rather than oxygen to 'fix' the dye, with an inspirationally wide variety of possible effects. These dyes, which are chemically similar to vat dyes, Inkodyes are developed by light instead of being applied in an oxygen-free bath and being developed in the fabric by exposure to oxygen. Inkodyes are true dyes, not fabric paints, even though they are painted or printed onto the fabric. (A dye actually itself attaches to the fabric; fabric paint includes a glue-like binder, which imparts a stiffer feeling to the fabric.)
Velour
A term for various fabrics with a velvety or napped surface and a thicker pile than velvet. Used for upholstery, curtains and clothing. The word comes from the French word for "velvet."
Velvet
A short, soft, dense pile fabric with a clipped nap. Made from silk, rayon, wool, or polyester.
Viscose
A fabric ideal for clothing because it drapes well and is soft after washing. Because viscose rayon is made of pure cellulose, it takes Procion dye very well and allows colors to be brilliant.
Voile
Fabric with a sheer look and it can hold shape. The cotton voile tends to be soft and gauzy, while voile silk, rayon, and acetate have a crisp feel.

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